Are Coyotes Really All That Dangerous?

Posted by admin On July - 1 - 2011

When it comes to coyotes in the Maine area, many people believe they might be dangerous to the people and the wildlife around. Not only are they becoming more powerful behind their ever growing population, but they are becoming less timid around people.

This is becoming a problem for those people who live near the woods, or wooded areas where the coyotes might be able to set up home with their families.

Coyotes are fierce creatures, and with the new non trapping of dogs law in effect, they have to be protected. This is something that might not hit well for those who have had their children attacked in their backyards by these creatures.

They are becoming harder than ever to control, and many people do not want to go outside because of them. This can mean that a lot more people are becoming afraid of what the coyotes might do if they continue to grow in numbers, and lose their fright towards humans. We could be in big trouble in the state of Maine.

Just recently, a child was attacked while jumping on a trampoline in her backyard by wild coyotes. It was during the day time, and the coyote was unprovoked by the child. This is a story that no one wants to hear, and the parents surely did not want their child to become harmed by something like this.

Of course, even when presenting this story to the board in Maine, they still feel that it is fit not to hunt these dogs or trap them because they need to be protected.

Who would be better off being protected? These wild dogs or human life?

The officials say that the wild dogs have to be protected, no matter how many incidents occur to human life. This is something that the people of Maine are trying to stop, and hopefully trapping laws will be lifted and they can once again go back to playing outside, and not living in fear if they live around these wooded areas where the coyotes also make their homes.

One Response to “Are Coyotes Really All That Dangerous?”

  1. Caleigh says:

    This is the most foolish thing I’ve ever read. If anyone is afraid of coyotes they either have serious issues or are really BIG babies. I have never once felt threatened by a coyote. I have lived in Maine my whole life and have come into contact with them billions of times. I once found a coyote tangled up in an old wire fence in the woods while riding my horse. I was able to approach her and untangle her without so much as a growl from her. After I freed her she casually stood up and trotted of into the woods, stopping only once to look back at the caring human who had helped her.

    The only coyotes that are becoming less afraid of humans are those of which live in urban areas. Most human attacks occur in these urban areas because the coyotes are in such close contact with humans on a regular basis. It doesn’t help the situation when humans intentionally feed coyotes food. It’s no wonder these idiots are being attacked. Obviously coyotes will begin to associate humans with food and in turn look to them for food. When was the last time a coyote attacked a human in Maine? The answer may surprise you, it’s NEVER. There are no documented reports of coyote attacks on humans in Maine. Over the past 40 years there have only been 142 reported coyote attacks on humans in the United States. The toddler on the trampoline mentioned above was from North Carolina. She lived through the attack. She was jumping on a trampoline unsupervised, I think that the parents are to blame for that one, not the coyote. I mean who lets a toddler jump on a trampoline unsupervised?!

    I have never heard of anyone in Maine being scared to go outside because of coyotes. If any of you reading this are then I think it’s time you put on your big girl panties, build a bridge and get the hell over it, because honestly there’s much better things to be afraid of. I for one am more terrified by our own human race than any creature that lives in the wild.

    I encourage anyone who believes this outrageous article to read this http://www.mfoa.net/news/wildlife_captive_wildlife/the_misunderstood_coyote.html